An Invitation from E. P. Dixon

I am an elder and a seeker. Many years ago I was given the honorary name, Sings Many Songs by a man called Bearheart, a lifelong friend and leader of Creek, Shawnee, Cherokee, Métis descent. The name was a gift to honor my interest and prayers for his people and my work to help him restore and keep alive the rightful place of the Creek Peoples in the history and cultural fabric of the Southeastern homeland.

I’m an outsider by nature, always looking through cracks in the fences of life, just trying to make sense of the world. Being an outsider can be lonely sometimes, but oh, what treasures can be found in most unexpected places. The name “Sings” began to take on a its purest meaning as I reached out for understanding and came to know some remarkable Native warriors hidden in a world of their own. As a writer and editor of sorts, my goal with Journeys of the Spirit is to give voice to two who have so enriched my life and my journey. Perhaps I may add a thought or two myself from time to time.

In the weeks and months to come, my hope is more and more people will come to know, love, and understand these two kind and generous Native elders through their own stories, art, wisdom, humor and insights into worlds few of us can even imagine as we follow their personal “Journeys of the Spirit.”

Ghost Dancer – Known as a “gentle giant,” a wise elder, teacher, artist, and keeper of the old ways, Ghost has a deep understanding of the spiritual and cultural traditions of the Southeastern Native Peoples, as well as the Lakota Sioux and other western tribal People. From his world, Ghost’s Sacred Path, honoring his Muskogee and Ani-Yun-Wiya ancestors, Ghost Dancer has a lifetime of fascinating stories, wisdom and thoughts to share that will expand your world as well.

Photo by Gabriela Palai on Pexels.com

Walks On The Grass – Readers will be riveted to each Chapter of LONG ROAD HOME as this delightfully warm and talented man shares an honest and compelling account of his amazing journey. From the first line, “I was born broken,” Walks navigates a path filled with bumps, boulders and wrong turns in search of wholeness. Through the grounding of songs, prayers and ceremony in the Inipi, traditional Lakota sweat lodge, and the support of wise elders and teachers, Walks gradually comes home to his true self. You won’t want to miss it. The fascinating story continues in ALONG THE WAY, a post script to Walks’ spiritual journey discussing in short essays experiences, insights & humor on the “Long Road Home.”

And me, I may have a few worthwhile things to say from time to time. We all invite you to join us and share your thoughts while we learn to navigate our way around the wonderful world of WordPress.

Published by E.P.Dixon

I am an elder and a seeker. Many years ago I was given the honorary name, Sings Many Songs by a lifelong friend and leader of Creek, Shawnee, Cherokee, Métis descent. The name was a gift to honor my interest and prayers for his people and my work to help him restore and keep alive the rightful place of the Creek Peoples in the history and cultural fabric of the Southeastern homeland. I’m an outsider by nature, always looking through cracks in the fences of life, just trying to make sense of the world. Being an outsider can be lonely sometimes, but oh, what treasures can be found in most unexpected places. The name “Sings” began to take on a its purest meaning as I reached out for understanding and came to know some remarkable Native warriors hidden in a world of their own. As a writer and editor of sorts, my goal with Journeys of the Spirit is to give voice to two who have so enriched my life and my journey. My hope is more and more people will come to know, love, and understand these two kind and generous Native elders through their own stories, art, wisdom, knowledge, humor and insights into worlds few of us can even imagine as we follow their personal “Journeys of the Spirit.” I may also have a few worthwhile things to say from time to time, and I might even invite some other writers to share stories about their spiritual journeys.

7 thoughts on “An Invitation from E. P. Dixon

  1. Edna Dixon, You are NOT an outsider. You are more full of Native American spirituality than almost any woman I know. Remember we Creeks have no concept of race. Being a Creek was defined by wanting to be part of a Creek community and being accepted by that community. During the height of Creek political and military power, its commanding general was a full-blooded Frenchman, who later returned to France to become one of Napoleon’s generals.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, Richard. You’re very sweet. But you see, I am by nature an outsider, or at least someone who is more introspective than social. But I am carrying out my calling and am so blessed to have such interesting and intelligent Native warriors among my friends. You haven’t met Walks yet, but I assure you, you’re going to be amazed!

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